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OPEN (NON-THEMATIC) ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL OF EARLY MODERN STUDIES






CALL FOR PAPERS


The Journal of Early Modern Studies is seeking contributions for its third issue (Fall 2013). This is an open (non-thematic) issue: The Editors of the Journal of Early Modern Studies are pleased to announce a call for papers for the Fall 2013 open (non-thematic) issue of JEMS. Submissions of articles and reviews falling within the general scope of JEMS are welcome.

Editor: Sorana Corneanu

JEMS is an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal of intellectual history, dedicated to the exploration of the interactions between philosophy, science and religion in Early Modern Europe. It is edited by the Research Centre “Foundations of Modern Thought”, University of Bucharest, and published and distributed by Zeta Books. For further information on JEMS, please visit http://www.zetabooks.com/journal-of-early-modern-studies.html For the Guidelines for Authors, please visit  http://www.zetabooks.com/download2/JEMS-Guidelines.pdf
We are seeking for articles no longer than 10,000 words, in English or French, with an abstract and key-words in English. Please send your contribution by the 1st of March 2013 to jems@zetabooks.com.

CFP: Studia UBB. Philosophia

Call for papers: Issue no. 3/2013 of Studia UBB. Philosophia: “Descartes’s Scientific and Philosophical Disputes with his Contemporaries” 

 “I beg all who have any objections to take the trouble to send them to me,” wrote Descartes a number of times in his career. Descartes’s eagerness to impose his views, in the name of “the search after truth,” engaged him in various controversies, from 1637, the year of the publication of the Discourse on method, to the end of his life. Apart from the famous “Objections and Replies” to the Meditations (1641), the Cartesian correspondence presents a large number of equally interesting disputes, on both scientific and philosophical topics. The letters often resemble a battlefield in which an attentive observer can distinguish various defense strategies: Trojan horses, conceptual traps, misquotes, etc. Often the aim was to disqualify the opponent not only as a bad thinker, but also as a hidden atheist. By the late 1640s, Descartes’s position within the fragile intellectual circle composed of French Catholics, novatores of various persuasions or Calvinist theologians became very unstable. His decision to accept Queen Christina’s invitation to Stockholm appears like an escape attempt from this imbroglio. 

 The present issue of Studia UBB will be dedicated to these confrontations. It aims to show, on the whole, the historical and conceptual relevance of contemporary reactions to Cartesianism for an assessment of both the novelty and the consistence of Descartes’s project. 

 Papers should be written in English, French or German. Articles cannot be longer than 75.000 characters, including spaces and footnotes. Reviews cannot be longer than 25.000 characters. The deadline for submission is 15 September 2013. Papers should follow the guidelines for the authors (http://www.studia.ubbcluj.ro/download/instr/philosophia.pdf) and be prepared for blind review. Submissions should be sent both to the editor, Ion Copoeru: copoeru@hotmail.com, and the guest editor, Vlad Alexandrescu: valexandrescu@gmail.com. 

http://studiaphilosophia.wordpress.com/call-for-papers-2/cfp-for-the-issue-no-32013-descartes-scientific-and-philosophical-disputes-with-his-contemporaries/

Princeton-Bucharest 2012 Seminar Participants

BUCHAREST-PRINCETON SEMINAR IN EARLY MODERN PHILOSOPHY
29 June – 4 July 2012
THE BATTLE FOR SCIENTIA IN THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY
Participants:
1. Dr. Ohad Nachtomy (Bar-Ilan University)
2. Dr. Tammy Nyden (Grinnell College)
3. Dr. Calin Cristian Pop (New Europe College, Bucharest)
4. Dr. Alexander Douglas (School of Advanced Studies, London)
5. Robin Buning (Utrecht University)
6. Robert Arnautu (Central European University + New Europe College, Bucharest)
7. Steven Burgess (University of South Florida)
8. Andrea Sangiacomo (University of Macerata + ENS Lyon)
9. Marcus Adams (University of Pittsburgh)
10. Fabrizio Baldassarri (Università degli Studi di Parma)
11. Lucian Petrescu (Ghent University)
12. Lucio Mare (University of South Florida)
13. Raphael Krut-Landau (Princeton University)
14. Madalina Giurgea (University of Bucharest)
15. Laura Georgescu (University of Bucharest)
16. Doina Rusu (University of Bucharest and University of Nijmegen)
17. Dragos Vadana (New Europe College, Bucharest)
18. Sandra Dragomir (University of Bucharest)
19. Max Gavrilciuc (University of Bucharest)
Staff:
1. Daniel Garber (Princeton University)
2. Roger Ariew (University of South Florida)
3. Igor Agostini (Università del Salento)
4. Daniel Andersson (University of Oxford, Wolfson College)
5. Vlad Alexandrescu (University of Bucharest)
6. Dana Jalobeanu (University of Bucharest)
7. Sorana Corneanu (University of Bucharest)

Bucharest-Princeton Seminar 2012



Bucharest-Princeton Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy


Bran, 29 June – 4 July 2012

THE BATTLE FOR SCIENTIA 
IN THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY






Programme


29 June

9.30 Departure to Bran from Hotel Flowers, Plantelor str. 2, Bucharest  (lunch on the way in Brașov)

17.00 Arrival in Bran (Vila Andra)

19.00 Dinner

30 June

9.30-10.30 Conference: Alexander Douglas (London): Spinoza, the Enlightenment, and the Idea of Social Science

10.30-10.45 Coffee break

10.45-13.00 Reading group (I): Bacon, Hooke, Sprat and the \’inductive\’ method
Convenors: Laura Georgescu, Dana Jalobeanu, Doina Rusu

Texts:

13.00-15.00 Lunch break

16.00-16.35 Daniel Andersson (Oxford): Imaginatio and Scientia


16.35-16.50 Coffee Break

16.50-17.25 Fabrizio Baldassarri (Parma): History and science: the battle for scientia. Descartes and Bacon
17.25-18.00 Robert Arnautu (CEU and New Europe College): Scientiaand banauson technai : The joint foundation for modern experimental science and technology

19.00 Dinner

1 July

9.30-10.30 Presentation & discussion of a book: Igor Agostini (Universita degli studi del Salento):L’idea di Dio in Descartes, Firenze, Le Monnier, 2011.

10.30-10.45 Coffee break

10.45-13.00 Reading group (II): Descartes\’ Regulae. Convenors: Igor Agostini, Vlad Alexandrescu, Lucian Petrescu

Texts: Regulae ad directionem ingenii, texte critique [latin] établi par Giovanni Crapulli, La Haye, Martinus Nijhof, 1951; english translation of Descartes’ letters by Dugald Murdoch in The Philosophical Writings of Descartes, vol. I, translated by J. Cottingham, R. Stoothoff, D. Murdoch, CUP, 1985, p. 7-77; French translation by J.L. Marion, in Descartes, Règles utiles et claires pour la direction de l’esprit et la recherche de la vérité, La Haye, Martinus Nijhoff, 1977.


13.00-15.00 Lunch break

16.00-16.35: Steven Burgess (South Florida), The Ontological Background of the Method of Demonstration in Descartes’ Meditations

16.35-16.50 Coffee break

16.50-17.25 Calin Cristian Pop (New Europe College): Ontologie inachevée de l’infini chez Descartes comme propédeutique de la scientia
17.25-18.00 Roger Ariew (South Florida), Condemnations of Cartesianism and the resulting empiricism


19.00 Dinner


2 July

9.30-10.05 Max Gavrilciuc(Bucharest): Soul Individuality in Descartes
10.05-10.40: Madalina Giurgea (Ghent): On speed, force and motion in Mersenne’s Traité de l’Harmonie Universelle

10.40-11.00 Coffee break

11.00-13.00 Reading group (III): A \’science\’ of the soul: Charleton, Convenor: Sorana Corneanu

Text: Walter Charleton, Natural History of the Passions, London, 1674, Sections I-III, pp. 2-67.

13.00-15.00 Lunch break

16.00-16.35 Robin Buning (Utrecht): Henricus Reneri’s programme for the renovation of natural philosophy

16.35-16.50 Coffee break

16.50 -17.25 Lucian Petrescu (Ghent): Peter Pázmány’s exegesis of Meteorologica IV
17.25-18.00 Raphael Krut-Landau (Princeton): The role of metaphysics in Spinoza’s philosophy

19.00 Dinner

3 July

9.30-10.30:  Conference : Andrea Sangiacomo (Macerata and Lyon ): Changing Descartes: Boyle, Spinoza and the debate on the relational nature of sensible qualities

10.30-10.45 Coffee break

10.45-13.00 Reading group (IV): Mathematical method: Newton. Convenor: Daniel Garber

Texts:

13.00-15.00 Lunch

16.00-16.35 Lucio Mare (South Florida): Infimae species in Heaven and Earth: on Leibniz’ Reception and Use of a Thomistic Individuation Principle

16.35-16.50 Coffee Break

16.50-17.25 Tammy Nyden, Not Scientia, but Not Nothing: de Volder on the Role of Experiment in Natural Philosophy
17.25-18.00 Ohad Nachtomy (Bar-Ilan University): Infinity and Life: The Role of Infinity in Leibniz’s View of Living Beings


19.00 Dinner

4 July


9.30 Departure to Bucharest



This Seminar is supported by a grant of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research, CNCS-UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-ID-PCE-2011-3-0998: Models of Producing and Disseminating Knowledge in Early Modern Europe: the Cartesian Framework.

CFP JEMS II (SPRING 2013)

The Journal of Early Modern Studies is seeking contributions for its second issue (Spring 2013). This special issue is devoted to the theme:
Creative experiments: Heuristic and Exploratory Experimentation in Early Modern Science

Editor: Dana Jalobeanu


The past decade has seen a renewed interest in multiple aspects of early modern experimentation: in the cognitive, psychological and social aspects of experiments, in their heuristic and exploratory value and in the complex inter-relations between experience, observation and experiment. Meanwhile, comparatively little has been done towards a more detailed, contextual and specific study of what might be described, a bit anachronistically, as the methodology of early modern experimentation, i.e. the ways in which philosophers, naturalists, promoters of mixed mathematics and artisans put experiments together and reflected on the capacity of experiments to extend, refine and test hypotheses, on the limits of experimental activity and on the heuristic power of experimentation. So far, the sustained interest in the role played by experiments in early modern science has usually centered on ‘evidence’- related problems. This line of investigation favored examination of the experimental results but neglected the “methodology” that brought about the results in the first place. It has also neglected the more creative and exploratory roles that experiments could and did play in the works of sixteenth and seventeenth century explorers of nature.
This special issue of the Journal of Early Modern Studies aims to bring together articles devoted to the investigation of particular cases of early modern experiments or early modern discussions of experimental methodology. We aim to put together a selection of interesting and perhaps relevant case studies that would further what might prove to be an interesting line of research, namely the investigation of the heuristic, analogical and creative role of early modern experiments.
JEMS is an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal of intellectual history, dedicated to the exploration of the interactions between philosophy, science and religion in Early Modern Europe. It is edited by the Research Centre “Foundations of Modern Thought”, University of Bucharest, and published and distributed by Zeta Books. For further information on JEMS, please visit http://www.zetabooks.com/journal-of-early-modern-studies.html.
We are seeking for articles no longer than 10,000 words, in English or French, with an abstract and key-words in English. Please send your contribution by the 1st of November 2012 to jems@zetabooks.com.

Descartes Team Structure

The team of the CNCS founded project “MODELS OF PRODUCING AND DISSEMINATING KNOWLEDGE IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE: THE CARTESIAN FRAMEWORK (code PN-II-ID-PCE-2011-3-0998), implemented at the New Europe College, under the supervision of Prof. Vlad Alexandrescu, is formed of the following members:
Full members:
Dr. Călin Cristian Pop (Cluj)
Dr. Grigore Vida (Bucharest)
Robert Arnăutu (Cluj)
Dragoș Vadana (Bucharest)

Associated members:
Dr. Robert Lazu (Timișoara)
Dr. Claudiu Gaiu (Cluj)
Dr. Ilinca Bălaș (Bucharest)

Research Assistant Job Announcement

COMPETITION

In order to complete the team of the CNCS founded project “MODELS OF PRODUCING AND DISSEMINATING KNOWLEDGE IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE: THE CARTESIAN FRAMEWORK (code PN-II-ID-PCE-2011-3-0998), implemented at the New Europe College, under the supervision of Prof. Vlad Alexandrescu, a competition is opened for 2 full-time positions at the level of Research Assistant.

The jobs are temporary, covering the entire duration of the project, which ends on December the 15th, 2014.

Requirements:

  1. Applicants should be enrolled in a MA or PhD programme in a discipline related to intellectual history (philosophy, philology, history, political science, etc.) or have completed such programmes.
  2. Applicants should document their interest and knowledge in the field of intellectual history and to be willing to enter an international programme devoted to Cartesian studies.
  3. Applicants should possess French and English at an advanced level. Notions of Latin are an advantage, yet there are not mandatory.
  4. Applicants should have organisation and communication skills.
  5. Applicants should be available for research stages abroad.

In order to apply, please send a letter of intent and a CV at the e-mail address: valexandrescu@gmail.com. Applicants can send any documents that they consider to be relevant to this position (scientific writing samples, MA dissertation, diplomas, recommendations etc.)

Applicants who meet the requirements will receive an e-mail, in order to attend an interview with the Project director, which will be held at the beginning of January 2012, at the New Europe College in Bucharest.

Researcher Job Announcement

COMPETITION

In order to complete the team of the CNCS founded project “MODELS OF PRODUCING AND DISSEMINATING KNOWLEDGE IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE: THE CARTESIAN FRAMEWORK (code PN-II-ID-PCE-2011-3-0998), implemented at the New Europe College, under the supervision of Prof. Vlad Alexandrescu, a competition is opened for 2 full-time positions at the level of Researcher.

The jobs are temporary, covering the entire duration of the project, which ends on December the 15th, 2014.

Requirements:

  1. Applicants should have completed a PhD programme in a discipline related to intellectual history (philosophy, philology, history, political science, etc.).
  2. Applicants should document their interest and knowledge in the field of intellectual history and to be willing to enter an international programme devoted to Cartesian studies.
  3. Applicants should possess French and English at an advanced level. Notions of Latin are an advantage, yet there are not mandatory.
  4. Applicants should have experience in writing scientific publications at a high standard.

We invite colleagues to express their interest in these positions by sending (i) a letter of intent, (ii) a professional CV and (iii) the PhD dissertation to the project directors e-mail address: valexandrescu@gmail.com.

The professional CV should contain the following topics:

a) education – degrees, diplomas, postdoctoral specialization periods;

b) professional experience – former employers, job description;

c) main research results – prizes, grants;

d) list of publications.

Applicants can send any documents that tey considere to be relevant to this position (scientific papers, diplomas, recommendations etc.)

Applicants who meet the requirements will receive an e-mail, in order to attend an interview with the Project director, which will be held at the beginning of January 2012, at the New Europe College in Bucharest.

The first issue (Fall 2012) of the Journal of Early Modern Studies is now published

A well known metaphor of the early European modernity and an important instrument in the understanding of seventeenth-century thought, the “Republic of Letters” was, in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, primarily a label for new projects of intellectual and scientific association. Various models for the Republic of Letters have been investigated and described as closed circles or open networks, shaped around a variety of elements: scientific societies, intellectual networks, formal or informal circles of intellectuals, proponents of the new and old philosophies. What all such models had in common was a an ideal of shaping communities around a moral, intellectual and sometimes a religious project understood as a reformation of the (whole) human being.


This special issue of the Journal of Early Modern Studies brought together articles devoted to the investigation of such models of early modern communities governed by the ideal of the Republic of Letters. The issue selected papers dedicated to the exploration of various ways of disseminating and communicating knowledge within the Republic of Letters, with a special focus on the exchanges between the East and the West of Europe.


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Articles 
Daniel Andersson, On Borrowed Time: Internationalism and its Discontents in a Late Sixteenth-Century University Library 
Noel Golvers, “Savant” Correspondence from China with Europe in the 17th-18th Centuries 
Roger Ariew, Descartes’ Correspondence before Clerselier: Du Roure’s La Philosophie 
Anne Davenport, English Recusant Networks and the Early Defense of Cartesian Philosophy 
Michael Deckard, Acts of admiration: Wondrous Women in Early Modern Philosophy 
Koen Vermeir, The Dustbin of the Republic of Letters. Pierre Bayle’s “Dictionaire” as an Encyclopedic Palimpsest of Errors 
J.B. Shank, A French Jesuit in the Royal Society of London: Father Louis-Bertrand de Castel, S.J. and Enlightenment Mathematics, 1720–1735 

Review Article 
Alexander Douglas, A Worldlier Spinoza: Susan James on the Tractatus Theologico-Politicus [Susan James. Spinoza on Philosophy, Religion, and Politics, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012]

Book Reviews 
Roger Ariew, Descartes among the Scholastics, Leiden: Brill, 2011 (Robert Arnăutu); Arnaud Milanese, Principe de la philosophie chez Hobbes. L’expérience de soi et du monde, Paris: Classiques Garnier, 2011 (Andrea Sangiacomo) 

Books received 
Guidelines for Authors

JEMS is an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal of intellectual history, dedicated to the exploration of the interactions between philosophy, science and religion in Early Modern Europe. It aims to respond to the growing awareness within the scholarly community of an emerging new field of research that crosses the boundaries of the traditional disciplines and goes beyond received historiographic categories and concepts.


JEMS publishes high-quality articles reporting results of research in intellectual history, history of philosophy and history of early modern science, with a special interest in cross-disciplinary approaches. It furthermore aims to bring to the attention of the scholarly community as yet unexplored topics, which testify to the multiple intellectual exchanges and interactions between Eastern and Western Europe during the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.



JEMS is edited by the Research Centre “Foundations of Modern Thought”, University of Bucharest (http://modernthought-unibuc.blogspot.com/), and published and distributed by Zeta Books (http://www.zetabooks.com/).




ISSN: 2285-6382
ISBN: 978-606-8266-35-0 (paperback)
ISBN: 978-606-8266-36-7 (ebook)
Availability: Paperback & Electronic (pdf)
Publication date: 25 October 2012
Size: 17 x 24 cm
Pages: 220
Language: English

PASSIONATE MINDS

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A 11-a Conferinţă a Societăţii Internaţionale pentru Istorie Intelectuală

PASSIONATE MINDS

Knowledge and the Emotions in Intellectual History

26-28 mai 2011

Biblioteca Centrală Universitară “Carol I”, Bucureşti

Conferinta Societăţii Internaţionale pentru Istorie Intelectuală (ISIH) aduce la Bucureşti 80 de cercetători din toată lumea. Filosofi, istorici ai ideilor, istorici ai ştiinţei şi ai artei vor prezenta timp de 3 zile, in 4 secţiuni paralele, lucrări care investighează relaţia dintre cunoaştere, raţiune şi emoţii în istoria intelectuală. Conferinţa este organizată cu sprijinul Universităţii din Bucureşti, al Bibliotecii Centrale Universitare şi al Institutului Cultural Român. Printre vorbitorii invitaţi se numără Vlad Alexandrescu (Universitatea din Bucureşti), Roger Ariew (University of South Florida), Daniel Garber (Princeton University), Peter Harrison (University of Oxford), Howard Hotson (University of Oxford, preşedintele ISIH). Conferinţa va fi deschisă în 26 mai, la ora 9, de un cuvânt de deschidere rostit de Rectorul Universităţii din Bucureşti, prof. dr. Ioan Pânzaru.

ISIH

Societatea Internaţională pentru Istorie Intelectuală este o asociaţie profesională de prestigiu înfiinţată în 1994, şi care reuneşte filosofi, istorici ai ideilor, istorici ai ştiinţei, istorici ai artei sau mentalităţilor. Pentru detalii vezi: http://www.history.ox.ac.uk/isih/

CONFERINŢE ISIH ANTERIOARE:

University of New Brunswick (1997); Freie Universität Berlin (1998); University of Chicago (2000); University of Cambridge (2001); University of New South Wales/University of Sydney (2002); Bogaziçi University, Istanbul (2003); University of Helsinki (2004); University of California, Davis (2005); Birkbeck, University of London (2007); University of Verona (2009).

CONFERINŢA DE LA BUCUREŞTI:

Participanţi:

80 participanţi, din care 20 români (de la Universitatea din Bucureşti, Universitatea de Vest din Timişoara, Universitatea de Vest “Vasile Goldiş” din Arad, Universitatea “Transilvania” din Braşov, Universitatea din Ploieşti si Academia Română) si 60 străini (de la universităţi, biblioteci şi institute de cercetare din Ankara, Antwerp, Atena, Barcelona, Belgrad, Berlin, Bologna, Cardiff, Copenhaga, Cracovia, Halifax, Helsinki, Ierusalim, Koln, Macerata, Madrid, Malta, Minas Gerais, Moscova, Oxford, Paris, Patras, Pisa, Thessaloniki, Toronto, Utrecht, Viena si Statele Unite ale Americii: Atlanta, Austin, Baltimore, Chicago, Claremont, Detroit, Grinnell, Evanston, Little Rock, New Albany, New York, Northridge, Pennsylvania).

Domeniile în care se vor ţine lucrările:

Istorie intelectuală antică şi medievală, istoria intelectuala a modernităţii timpurii şi a iluminismului, istorie socială, culturală şi politică, cultură materială, psihologie, psihanaliză, evoluţionism, neuroştiinţe, fenomenologie, estetică, epistemologie.

Organizatori locali:

Sorana Corneanu, Lector în Anglistică, PhD (Universitatea din Bucureşti) şi membru ISIH

Dana Jalobeanu, Lector în Filosofie, PhD (Universitatea din Bucureşti) şi secretar general ISIH

Tema generală:

Conferinţa abordează concepţiile istorice privitoare la interacţiunea dintre cunoaştere şi emoţii, ori dintre viaţa cognitivă şi cea afectivă a indivizilor şi comunităţilor. Fie că este vorba despre dobândirea şi transmiterea cunoaşterii, despre agregarea şi reconfigurarea comunităţilor, despre relaţia individului cu sine, cu alţii ori cu divinitatea, despre educaţie şi metode pedagogice, despre expresia şi receptarea artistică, sau despre concepţia valorilor şi principiilor morale, politice şi juridice care stau la baza societăţilor – ideea după care raţiunea şi emoţiile se plasează în tabere diferite sau chiar opuse se dovedeşte insustenabilă. Noi cercetări în domeniile ştiinţei cognitive, antropologiei culturale, filosofiei morale ori teoriei literaturii şi artelor au început să depăşească această idee tradiţională şi să pună în lumină complexitatea vieţii cognitiv-afective a fiinţei umane. Istoricii ideilor sunt în măsură să aducă un aport important acestei direcţii de cercetare, prin semnalarea formelor pe care tema le-a primit în istoria gândirii şi a practicilor culturale. Istoria se poate dovedi o bogată resursă de reflecţie şi intuiţii pentru preocupările actuale. Conferinţa de la Bucureşti se doreşte a fi un forum pentru o astfel de reflecţie.